Student hopes deya machine goes global

Vikash Bri­j­mo­han, 22, hopes that his waxed deya fill­ing ma­chine would one day make an im­pact on the in­dus­try.

Bri­j­mo­han, a res­i­dent of Las Lo­mas, grad­u­at­ed with his BSc in elec­tri­cal and com­put­er en­gi­neer­ing from UWI on Thurs­day. He said the project was his fi­nal year project at the uni­ver­si­ty.

He said the de­vice cost him $3,500 to make and it can fill a deya with hot wax every 0.7 sec­onds when com­pared to man­u­al fill­ing that takes just un­der 10 sec­onds per deya.

He said UWI owns the rights to the project and he would like to see it go in­to pro­duc­tion. Bri­j­mo­han said the pro­to­type runs on a sys­tem that us­es pro­gram­ma­ble log­ic con­trollers which are the same de­vices that are used to op­er­ate traf­fic lights.

He said a full-sized de­vice would in­clude sys­tems for pack­ag­ing and dry­ing of the fi­nal prod­uct. He said the de­vice has got­ten a lot of pub­lic at­ten­tion since he show­cased it at the Di­vali Na­gar in­clud­ing prais­es from the In­di­an High Com­mis­sion.

Bri­j­mo­han said af­ter grad­u­at­ing he is still await­ing job place­ment since he at­tend­ed uni­ver­si­ty on a schol­ar­ship.

Student hopes deya machine goes global

byShastri Boodan11 hours agoSun Oct 27 2019

Vikash Brijmohan gives a demonstration of his automated deya filling device at the Divali Nagar on Friday.
Vikash Brijmohan gives a demonstration of his automated deya filling device at the Divali Nagar on Friday.
Vikash Brijmohan

Vikash Brijmohan © Shastri Boodan

Vikash Bri­j­mo­han, 22, hopes that his waxed deya fill­ing ma­chine would one day make an im­pact on the in­dus­try.

Bri­j­mo­han, a res­i­dent of Las Lo­mas, grad­u­at­ed with his BSc in elec­tri­cal and com­put­er en­gi­neer­ing from UWI on Thurs­day. He said the project was his fi­nal year project at the uni­ver­si­ty.

He said the de­vice cost him $3,500 to make and it can fill a deya with hot wax every 0.7 sec­onds when com­pared to man­u­al fill­ing that takes just un­der 10 sec­onds per deya.

He said UWI owns the rights to the project and he would like to see it go in­to pro­duc­tion. Bri­j­mo­han said the pro­to­type runs on a sys­tem that us­es pro­gram­ma­ble log­ic con­trollers which are the same de­vices that are used to op­er­ate traf­fic lights.

He said a full-sized de­vice would in­clude sys­tems for pack­ag­ing and dry­ing of the fi­nal prod­uct. He said the de­vice has got­ten a lot of pub­lic at­ten­tion since he show­cased it at the Di­vali Na­gar in­clud­ing prais­es from the In­di­an High Com­mis­sion.

Bri­j­mo­han said af­ter grad­u­at­ing he is still await­ing job place­ment since he at­tend­ed uni­ver­si­ty on a schol­ar­ship.

He plans to con­struct an au­to­mat­ed co­conut grater to pro­duce co­conut oil and a soap mak­er suit­able for home-based man­u­fac­tur­ers. He said, “I would like to con­grat­u­late all of the 2019 grad­u­ates from UWI and wish them the best of luck. There are hun­dreds of mil­lions of Hin­dus glob­al­ly and I am sure my pro­to­type will have some im­pact on the glob­al in­dus­try and maybe it can as­sist lo­cal man­u­fac­tur­ers to ex­port and curb the im­por­ta­tion of waxed deyas.”

He added, the de­part­ment of elec­tri­cal and com­put­er en­gi­neer­ing pro­duces a high cal­i­bre of grad­u­ates and his project is one of sev­er­al ex­cel­lent ex­am­ples of how in­no­v­a­tive grad­u­ates can be.

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